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it out of the way. this is part of this project. my main character is alexander. [inaudible] don't take it personal. my aim, i guess is to at the end of my novel that [inaudible] good mexican novelists. alexander looked at the mirror and saw a mexican stairing back at him. the bad mexican had paid alexander a visit much the conversation from last night's party brought him back in full force. why did he always have to open his big mouth. why tell people that don't care that he hated and despised? he actually might like the [inaudible] hated me english and spanish he could not understand how someone could say he was mexican having been born in the usa. he doesn't like going to mexican places. he does not like to discuss beer and shots of tequilla. he never listened to spanish radio stations. no more mexicans. who did not have a problem being objective with a mexican. [inaudible]. i should try to do something about this he thought this is not good. may be i should try, may be i should make an effort. may be i should drive to the mission and spend quality time with my own people. i'm sure i
with this encore presentation. >>> eben and holley alexander are at a high school soccer game cheering on their high school son bond. they are an american family with an extraordinary story. they have been touched by a medical miracle and maybe more. >> it was impossible after impossible after impossible. >> reporter: eben alexander survived a near-death experience and now carries the memory of what he says was a journey to heaven, a journey that all his scientific training can not explain. on november 10th, 2008, eben awoke with a searing headache. when holley checked on him he was having a tremendous seizure. >> i said say something and he didn't say anything. zblbt eben was rushed to the hospital where he was a neurosurgery. >> all we could make out was help and screaming. >> reporter: he had been stricken with a rare and virulent ecloy meningitis infection. >> i was trying to die. >> reporter: doctors gave him almost no chance to live and told his family if he did survive he would be brain damaged if rest of his life. >> his eye was off and cocked. it was like no one was there. >>
are, william alexander, "goblin secrets." [applause] published by margaret k. books, simon and schuster's children's publishing. a wholly original fantasy about masking and finding. kerry, out of reach. [applause] published by simon bowles, simon & schuster's children's publishing, a story of the links of love and loss. patricia mccormick, never fall down. [applause] published by harper's and collins, a harrowing and bravely told story of survival and resilience during the timely -- [inaudible] spent elliott, endangered. [applause] published by scholastic books, a story of love and empathy that extends beyond all boundaries, even though the line between species. steve, bomb. [applause] the race to build and steal the world's most dangerous weapon, published by flashpoint, an imprint of roaring brook press. a riveting thriller of a book that tells of the birth of a new age. to all these writers, thank you. thank you for your work. and thank you for what it will mean to young readers in our nation. this year's national book award for young peoples literature goes to william a
on was something note senator alexander said earlier. we need to find more and use less. i think you're asking about the use less part. the extension of the changing fuel efficiency standards was one thing, but we believe fervently in the need to diversify away from using petroleum for transportation and given that it represents 70% of our use of petroleum to begin with. with the change in technology and the access to so much homegrown natural gas, we can use that and we can also use the development of electricity and its usability in automobiles and light trucks. >> what about the role of the government? somebody has to be making sure we are not doing dangerous things in small, enclosed places. find more coming years last, and someone has to make sure we are not doing dangerous things, as the admiral pointed out. >> i am a private sector guy, and i believe in the application of private and free markets for the development of our country, but there are times it is clear when the government has an unfortunate role to play. in fred's introductory comments, the argument was very clear. the market
very much. mr. alexander. >> hello i am josh alexander. i live in the castro and i'm not a nudist but i oppose this ban. people say we need it because they're offended. well, i am offended. i am offended by this proposed legislation that i have to come to this hearing to speak up for freedom and diversity and san francisco values shouldn't be under attack by someone purporting to represent all districts, district eight. i am offended and legislation that ask people to mind their own business. one doesn't need to be a health professional and other people should dress according to your preferences and upset if they don't. they can't point to anything to support their issues. if proponents really think this legislation has broad support then i say prove it. put it to the voters on the ballot. don't let a small group of disgruntled conservatives to impose their will on us and it's not democracy and it's not what we put you in office to do. thank you. >> thank you. next speaker. actually before you go i apologize let me call more names and anyone that wants to make public comment wh
. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuries. in cuba, nobody remembers him but it was the street of calle oreilly, famous until the 50's for its banks and bookstores. it was one of the favorite streets of (inaudible) secretary of the spanish count of fernandino, my grandfather, another irish man feeling at home in havana. there, at the busy corner of calle street and oreilly was a cafe bakery owned by a catelan. it was described by many foreigners,
are favored by 3.5 points at fedex field. they went through a good practice -- rg3 and the rental alexander pro bowl. -- lorenzo alexander pro bowl. the redskins have at the nfc's top running game. >> we have been able to put a lot of yards and points all year. it is not something you have to boast about, but usually when people think of the teams that are great offensive lee, our name is not in there. but i think people are starting to realize we have something. not just our running game. the combination of both. >> the redskins are favored by 3.5. we had the military bowl at rfk stadium. let me take you back downtown -- san jose state and bowling green. san jose scored early. the 33-yard touchdown. they were up 7-0. late in the third -- jones for san jose state stops on a dime. finds the end zone. 19-13, san jose. spartans win the game 29-20. there is a look at sports. >> consider yourself lucky if you have tickets to sunday's's game. if you do not, the next best thing may be the local businesses offering plenty of room, food and drink for you to catch the action. >> at this bar in colum
years a and still have not made a decision. paul alexander robo book called pandemic people versus terms. 40 years? >> the product was invented to start a review process. the fda decided it was safe to be effective they weren't certain that if was safe and there is some environmental group. then the environmental groups came into protests it was substance was dangerous. and to have rearch to back it up. >> and to save nine humans to use the product but a and the ap -- epa to label the pesticide. >> is good for identified this. john: it kills a pass. >> the epa bacteria is a fancy word for a germ is considered a past. then these in midges of ddt. >> johnson & johnson and? >> quite an extensive use of. maybe they say tt publicly but to predict it will happen in the future. finally after 40 years they make a decision to go against them. in terms of planning commit makes sense to assume after 40 years they may never make a decision if they do, it may not be in their favor. is a safe product and it is then your toothpaste. john: your tax dollars at work? >> more horrible examples of governmen
-mails is alexander hamilton what thomas jefferson and one to get on the record and then move on if he's sitting there pleading his case and jefferson is looking sort of blow seng in that vaguely charming we had. he's not like fdr that you can leave. anyone that left his company thought he agreed with them. it's to get for the moment and not such a great way to get through the day as it turns out to he is my contact with davis and goes, grabs the fly it begins pulling apart. davis begins to realize that man of for quite as well as he hoped. a second story. there you have the man that can snap a fly, pulled apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be to read often making you thinking he is not focused. he traveled through. it was a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn and falls into a conversation with a fellow guest and they have a lovely, wide ranging discussion the next morning the other guest mr. jefferson is up and out and the other guest had never called his name and he said to the inn keeper who was that and he said who did you think it was? for a
a little bit, dave ross will be here. he has another interview with lorenzo alexander of the redskins coming up. >> good morning. you saw the visibility. iality better than it was yesterday. during the afternoon yesterday, the fog got dense for a while. >> it did. that was weird. >> i think we'll see more sunshine than we've seen the last couple of days and temperatures which will be bothered aring on the balmy side, upper 50s. >> it feels good. it is after all. >> december 18th. i know because it is my mother's birthday. >> oh, happy birthday j allison's daughter's birthday is today as well. >> that's right. >> december 18th. more sunshine, temperatures upper 50s. one region that has a dense fog advisory up toward hagerstown, martinsburg as you get into western maryland. you've gait dense fog advisory. eastern west virginia as well. dense fog advisory until #:00 a.m. the rest of us, visibility should be improving. we will not be dealing with the dense fog we had around here. here we are, 49 now in washington. 52 in annapolis. these temperatures obviously very warm for this time year.
care seats. [applause] our panel discussion is about to begin featuring senator lamar alexander and our moderator. >> can you hear me now? good morning, everyone. i'm in lazy moderator. want to talk about this report, talk about the future of energy in this country and the future of transportation. i want to make sure you know to please jump in. i don't want to ask a question and ask another question. do we all agree? wonderful. let me start with fred. we have heard about this new found or renewed abundance for energy. i have heard people this week, saudi america. we have all this energy. how do we leverage it and harness it? >> it is important to take the hyperbole of comments like america being the new saudi arabia of energy and put it in perspective. 18.7 burning about billions of liquid fuels today. we produce after an incredible increase of domestic production about 6.5 billion barrels of oil per day. when you take biofuels and the natural gas liquids, it is about 9 million barrels per day. we are still importing an enormous amount of petroleum. the first thing about our recommenda
. >> thank you, charlie. last but not least, alexander. with a charming santa house. alexander comes from the -- alexander's adoptable. we hope you find alexander as cute as we do. do we have a winner? >> wait. hold on. >> all right. there's a conference. a conference going on. this is all -- there can only be one winner, ladies and gentlemen. although, they will all get dog treats from the lovely rolling dog treat table. >> okay, okay, we have a decision. >> what is it? >> it's 3-1. george was our alone holdout for somebody else, but we're going with alexander. >> alexander. >> he is the winner of the dog fashion show. >> and the bone is as large as alexander. . >>> good morning i'm kristen sze. lcua san mateo neighborhood are back home this morning. a womanúbz volatile chemicals in her garage. the bomb squad decided it was safe owes to dig a hole and detonate the chemicals on thegíe spot. >>> let's check in on your morning commute.k >>> southbound 101 ingpht marinwood, accident atmfk÷ millr creek, a little farther south from that you can see traffic still sluggish to central san ra
's bring in our man at the white house, peter alexander standing by. pete, we just got word the president it appears is making some sort of smaller offer at this 3:00 meeting. any idea what smaller might mean? >> reporter: it's a good question, craig. actually kelly o'donnell reporting some more of this from the hill. she says that income level of $400,000 that the president had more recently offered as the place beneath which he wanted to make sure there was an extension of the bush era tax cuts according to kelly not a part of this plan. democrats say that offer for the president which represented a compromise that we had heard about last week as part of a bigger proposal is not a part of the plan to be discussed behind closed doors. only a short time from now. the real question is where that number will be. not the $250,000 you presumed that republicans balked at long ago. perhaps closer to $500,000. given the fact that house speaker john boehner couldn't get his own conference to pass tax cuts for those making less than $1 million, it seems like it's still a tough drag for all those b
a smaller offer. for the latest, we bring in peter alexander from the white house and mike viqueira from capitol hill. peter, let's talk about what's going on at the white house meeting. i hear senators are optimistic about a mini deal which, of course, will raise taxes on those above $400,000. expand the amt, cut some spending. what are you hearing? >> reporter: well, hearing a lot of different things right now. one of the items and ruled by rumor and then denials and frustrations, toure. we know that we saw senators mcconnell and reid arriving a short time ago. we didn't pelosi and boehner arrive yet but the vice president joe biden got here a short time ago, as well. there's other reporting from the hill right now about the potential that the president is going to return to what was basically his original outlined plan. perhaps a smaller plan but a plan where the threshold would be set closer to $250,000 as he initially had before the $400,000 offer that john boehner the white house would contend walked away from when he proposed his $1 million threshold in this situation right now. t
to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are competitive with other nations and other nations are setting up industries, we need to make sure that we have fair trade. we have to make sure that we are providing incentives, economic incentives for new industries, clean technology, could almost get the justification for funding -- for funding that through hamilton's argue. hamilton makes the argument that we need infrastructure and roads to support manufacturers. he makes the argument that we need the right tax incentives, and that we need a right of work force that is educated. jefferson has the view that the government needs to support manufacturing. now, this becomes the american economic system and influences henry, abraham lincoln, and is the governing philosophy of america's rise in industrialization. herbert hoover, when i got to the commerce building, and why would you
-granddaughter, sylviapaul jennings alexander. she was the family historian, the keeper of the jennings family tradition. family oral tradition and several jennings direct descendants are in the audience today. knocked mrs. alexander. she died year-and-a-half after i got to know her. she was by far the last survivor of that generation. her father, her grandfather, paul's son franklin lived to be 90 and she spent a lot of her growing up years in her grandparents's home. so she was able to hear these family stories from the 's mouths. her own father was a slave and her grandfather was a slave until age 20 himself. this is rare in 2008 when i met her and she had this likeness of paul jennings on her living-room wall. very rare to be able to debrief the slave descendant whose family stories do go back to slavery days. getting to know all of the descendantss but especially sylvia jennings alexander, very much informed my story and enriched my life. i interpret paul jennings's story as a deliberate, courageous and successful pursuit of that most american of promises, the right to rise. after jennings had work
. [laughter] so, and of all the founders, the most likely to have sent shirtless e-mails is alexander hamilton. [laughter] want to get that on the record, and then we'll move on. matthew davis is sitting there pleading his case, and jefferson's looking sort of -- listening in that vaguely charming way he had. you could leave, and everyone who left his company thought he agrueled with them which was -- agreed with them which was a wonderful way to get through the moment, not such a agreement way to get through the day. and there's a fly buzzing around. and jefferson's nodding and nodding and is in eye contact with davis and goes -- grabs the fly and begins pulling it apart. [laughter] davis begins to realize this payment work out quite as well -- this may not work out quite as well as he hoped. second story. so there you have the man who can snap a fly, pull it apart and ferociously focused when he needs to be, often making you think he's not focused. he traveled through a couple of days' ride from monticello to washington. he stopped at an inn, he falls into conversation with a fellow guest at
years old, daniel is already doing real work in this lab run by alexander lin who has a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. daniel's job on this day is to create an artificial equivalent to brain tissue known as a phantom. the it is later scanned by an mri machine and then analyzed, an experiment that may one day help make cranial diagnoses possible without incisions into the skull and brain. it's a complicated research that lynn says gives daniel new tasks and learning opportunities every day. >> we look at traumatic brain injury, and a number of neurological disorders as well as other diseases in other parts of the body. i think he really does have a good grasp of what we are trying to do. >> reporter: the hospital has been hiring teenagers like daniel for the past 12 years as parts of its student success jobs cram. -- program. >> we're starting at very early ages to try to help young people see that being in school is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life. and in your career. >> reporter: mclean says the program wa
is already doing real work in this lab run by alexander lin who has a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biophysics. daniel's job on this day is to create an artificial equivalent to brain tissue known as a phantom. the it is later scanned by an mri machine and then analyzed an experiment that may one day help make cranial diagnoses possible without incisions into the skull and brain. it's a complicated research that lynn says gives daniel new tasks and learning opportunities every day. >> we look at traumatic brain injury, and a number of neurological disorders as well as other diseases in other parts of the body. i think he really does have a good grasp of what we are trying to do. >> reporter: the hospital has been hiring teenagers like daniel for the past 12 years as parts of its student success jobs cram. -- program. >> we're starting at very early ages to try to help young people see that being in school is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life. and in your career. >> reporter: mclean says the program was originally designed to give s
alexander from park life as well to reinvigorate the merchants association with long time leaders like jesse fink, but to bring more visitors to clement street as one of the city's destination spots. one of the great examples of events that's coming up with clement time in about 48 hours we're going to be celebrating from 5:00 to 9:00 clement time which brings many new people to the richmond district on clement street but also highlights the great businesses and the liveliness of our neighborhood in the richmond district. so i'll just say that a lot of the work that cynthia and clement street merchants bring are really keeping our neighborhood livable such as streetscape improvements and working with department of public works keeping it clean and livable. they see bigger issues also about really the understanding of the impacts of chain stores, but also how small businesses really are the backbone of our neighborhood. and support for businesses that are facing ada or accessibility lawsuits and other things is really important with legal assistance. but also merchants supporting other mercha
cliff still looms. we begin our coverage with nbc's white house correspondent, peter alexander who has been watching the developments all day. peter, good evening to you. >> reporter: natalie, good evening to you. after his first meeting with all of the top four congressional lawmakers since before thanksgiving, the president marched into the briefing room here at the white house and he said the time for immediate action is now. he called for a bipartisan agreement and said to congressional leaders, warning them the public's patience has worn out. after an hour-long closed-door meeting with the president, both the democratic and republican congressional leaders left the white house without saying a word. later, president obama weighed in. >> the american people are not going to have any patience for a politically self-inflicted wound to our economy. not right now. the economy is growing, but sustaining that trend is going to require elected officials to do their jobs. >> reporter: and back at the capitol, senate majority leader, harry reid, described the meeting as constructive. >> we'
alexander, at the ranks of the white house correspondents, with a look at all of it. >> reporter: brian, good evening, on the north lawn, the phone call marks the first time speaker john boehner and the president spoke in a week, that is hardly something to celebrate, but they wouldn't characterize what they caused in the phone call as the country barrels towards the fiscal cliff. with no talks and no progress to avert the looming fiscal cliff, you could say the house has left the building, streaming out of the capitol. tomorrow's session cancelled. with only three work days left this year, they are often criticized. just 16 votes. across the country, rising frustration, americans asking why the holdup. and what will their taxes look like in 2013. >> maybe instead of getting my sister two things, you give one thing, you have to give pause on what could happen next year. >> reporter: today, president obama and house republicans are locked in a politicalstair staredown. >> we can probably solve it in a week, it is not that tough, we need that breakthrough that says we need to do a balance
alexander in our washington newsroom tonight. peter, good evening. >> reporter: lester, good evening to you. the head of the nra, wayne lapierre, said guns are not the problem. instead, he took aim what the he called the media machine in this country, a cracked system for dealing with mentally ill, and the federal government, whose enforcement of existing restrictions on guns he called pitiful. facing a barrage of tough questions for the first time since its deadly massacre in newtown, on meet the appreciation the nra's ceo, wayne lapierre, forcefully defended his call for armed officers in every school. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. it's the one thing that will keep americans safe the nra is going to do that. >> reporter: critics point to columbine and virginia tech, both of which had armed guards, unable to stop the carnage. but the leading voice disagrees for the gun lobby. >> say i'm mom or dad and dropping my child off at school, i feel
, general alexander referenced the fisa amendments act and talked in particular about the minimization procedures that apply to collection of u.s. communications. understand, mr. president, and colleagues, this was at a big, open technology conference. general alexander said that when the n.s.a. sweeps up communications from a -- quote -- "good guy -- which i think we all assume is a law-abiding american -- the n.s.a. has -- and i quote here --" requirements from the fisa court and the attorney general to minimize that which means nobody else can see it unless there's a crime that's been committed." now, anybody who hears that phrase says that's pretty good and i imagine that's what people in that technology meeting and the conference call wanted to hear. the only problem, mr. president, is it's not true. it's not -- it's not true at all much the privacy protections providedly these procedures are simply not as strong as general ale alexanr made them out to be. senator udall and i wrote him a letter asking him to please correct the record. the first paragraphs of the letter were, "you
and gentlemen, our panel discussion is about to begin, featuring senator lamar alexander, senator roy blunt, and our moderator, christine romans. >> can you hear me now? there we go. good morning, rn. -- all right. so i'm a lazy moderator. i've warned everyone. we want to get the ball rolling and talk about this report, talk about the future of energy in this country, and the future of transportation and america's national security with regards to energy. but i want to make sure that all of you know to please jump in. i don't want to ask a question and then ask another question. i want this to be a discussion, and i'll steer it. everyone agree? do we all agree? wonderful. let me start first with fred. nice to see you again. >> good to see you. >> you've heard the findings of the report, the summary of the recommendations. we have heard about this new abundance, newfound or renewed abundance for energy in the united states and i've heard people this week -- the new buzzword last week and this week, saudi-america. we have all of this energy. fred, how do we harness it? how do we leverage it?
care seats. our panel discussion is about to begin featuring senator lamar alexander and our moderator. >> can you hear me now? good morning, everyone. i'm in lazy moderator. want to talk about this report, talk about the future of energy in this country and the future of transportation. i want to make sure you know to please jump in. i don't want to ask a question and ask another question. do we all agree? wonderful. let me start with fred. we have heard about this new found or renewed abundance for energy. i have heard people this week, saudi america. we have all this energy. how do we leverage it and harness it? >> it is important to take the hyperbole of comments like america being the new saudi arabia of energy and put it in perspective. we're burning about 18.7 billions of liquid fuels today. we produce after an incredible increase of domestic production about 6.5 billion barrels of oil per day. when you take biofuels and the natural gas liquids, it is about 9 million barrels per day. we are still importing an enormous amount of petroleum. the first thing about our recommendation
riley, john provost ♪as timmy and of course lassie alexander the great. he's only a ginny pig. what's so great? can he do tricks? no. but the great? that means something special. well...he is. what? because i raised him myself and he's black and white...with blue eyes. that's nothing. and he's been on a special diet. see how shiney his coat is? let's do something. like what? i don't know but i'm tired of kid stuff. ♪ why don't we explore out there? maybe we'll find buried treasure. in those rocks? sure. or maybe a wild animal? take your wagon just in case. come on get your wagon. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ listen. i hear something. look! that's only an old squirrel. yeah but he's wild. he's not wild enough. listen to lassie. sounds like she's really found something. ♪ ♪ ♪ wow! boy! that's more like it! a parachute! bet it's the first time you ever saw a real parachute. lassie has found something else. let's see. boy oh boy! what is it? i don't know. but it must be valuable. see...it was tied onto the parachute. nothing lik
. peter alexander, good morning. >> reporter: good to visit with you right now. you were just noting that fog at joint base andrews as the president was boarding air force one trying to understand what's taking place behind the scenes in these fiscal talks, trying to kind of see through that dense fog. it does prove some charges. today the president in his latest pr offensive as you noted will go to detroit. this, of course, is a place where he will expect to get a warm welcome for effectively saving the auto industry. he will be at daimler's plant in the community of redford just outside of detroit. today they're going to announce some plans, the investment of more than $100 million in new technology among other things. they say their recent successes will help provide them new jobs going forward. but it's as much about the economy as it is about what the president says needs to happen with house republicans going forward to keep this economy on track. again, he's going to make the point that the tax rates need to go up for the top 2% of americans. trying to put that pressure, again
book washington -- -- alexander hamilton one of the chapters in the book talks about hamilton's history of womanizing. for example bill clinton was not the first and bill clinton was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long history of it and arnold schwarzenegger and john edwards, david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read for example letters written by martha washington going to the winter camp, she didn't complain about the weather. she didn't complain about the harsh conditions but she did complain about one thing. there was a was a tomcat one winter that was misbehaving and it was noisy and kept her awake at night so she nicknamed the tomcat alexander hamilton. because of all the young girls will come into the camp. i also did a book a few years ago called life in the white house about the presidents and these. what hobbies do they have? what were their fears and hopes and what did they -- or were they like his fathers and husbands as another way of stressing presidential characters providing us with another lens. we are all still
alexander valley road, we're looking at some light to moderate showers there. cloverdale, we're wet. but we are dry from san francisco all the way up to san mateo. further south to mountain view and cupertino. this break continues. we'll see scattered showers on and off. but there's more heavy rainfall before we're finished. because of that next round of rain, storm no. 3, the flash flood watch for the north bay and the mountains continues. the flood watch for the russian river continues. rainfall totals from earlier today, morgan hill, palo alto, two-plus inches of rain. three inches for blackhawk. san francisco, at the airport, nearly two inches of rainfall. we do have changes to the forecast. the timing of this weekend storm system, and a change to that flood watch for the russian river. >>> today's storm will leave quite a mess all over the bay area. the saturated ground in san francisco caused this tree to topple on to a mercedes in pacific heights. fortunately, nobody was hurt. in the north bay, all eyes on the fast-rising russian river. another big storm could bring the river to floo
de 16 a 24 aÑos. >>> uno de los reclusos seleccionados, es alexander nieves andrade que pagÓ 21 de 99 aÑos de condena por homicidio. >>> dentro de la instituciÓn se sufre a diario, cada segundo de vida aunque tengamos privilegios, por ejemplo esto, promover un programa importante. >>> para expresar experiencias envÍan los mensajes desde una computadora estrictamente vigilada. >>> puerto rico experimenta una crisis social, tiene 12500 habitantes en cÁrceles, y reportÓ mÁs de 1100 homicidios el aÑo pasado, se busca cambiar por programas como este. >>> el empleo de este programa piloto estÁ en marcha, sobrepasa 7 mil seguidores en menos de dos dÍa de ser lanzado, el departamento de correcciÓn de puerto rico, espera y confÍa que la curiosidad por visitar la pÁgina, haga cumplir el objetivo de la campaÑa, en guaynabo puerto rico, linda candelo, noticias univisiÓn. >>> los familiares del presidente egipcio fueron evacuados de sus casas, bajo un fuerte custodia por protestas de opositores al mandatario, la tomaron a la medida luego de una protesta de jÓvenes alrededor de la ca
was a virgin, alexander the great's mother was a virgin. >> you mean in that type of mythtology. >> they didn't allude to isiah because they weren't jews. one way of saying a person is important is to have their mom be a virgin at the birth of the hero. >> who was sells us. >> he wasn't a roman historian, i was a floss fur. >> clus. >> yes. >> he wrote a book on the true teaching he criticized judaism and christianity. >> what did he say jesus' origin was. >> that's a story about a roman soldier dating mary before,g no foundation in fact? >> no, it's a way to discredit a tradition. >> is there any basis in biolo for parthenogenesis, human biology, has it ever occurred? >> before technology, i'm sure technologically we can do all sorts of things. >> before technology. >> before technology do virgins -- how would i know? have i don't know, it seems to me if you're trying to establish the legitimacy of mary being a virgin one thing you would want to inquire is if it's ever happened independently of mythology and technology. >> well, i would wonder how i'd have access to that information. there i
not made a decision. paul alexander robo book called pandemic people versus terms. 40 years? >> the product was invented to start a review process. the fda decided it was safe to be effective they weren't certain that if was safe and there is some environmental group. then the environmental groups came into protests it was substance was dangerous. and to have research to back it up. >> and to save nine humans to use the product but a and the ap -- epa to label the pesticide. >> is good for identified this. john: it kills a pass. >> the epa bacteria is a fancy word for a germ is considered a past. then these in midges of ddt. >> johnson & johnson and? >> quite an extensive use of. maybe they say that publicly but to predict it will happen in the future. finally after 40 years they make a decision to go against them. in terms of planning commit makes sense to assume after 40 years they may never make a decision if they do, it may not be in their favor. is a safe product and it is then your toothpaste. john: your tax dollars at work? >> more horrible examples of government good intention gone
together. >> pastor nicolaus alexander. this morning, he was sent to a neighborhood for another shooting. the first shooting took place in front of the pastor's home on saturday when someone shot and killed a neighborhood while he was sitting in his car. >> we were friends. he was by neighbor. and so he wasn't a gang member or somebody that is on the streets or whatnot. he was a father. >> reporter: this morning, pastor says williams stepson was a block or so away from friends when someone opened fire. bullets struck the man and grazed a man by him. >> i don't see for what. >> reporter: we went to the ant i don't think police department -- antioch police department earlier this evening. crime statistics were released that show that violent crimes are up this year. the pastor says he'll continue his stance against crime. >> there's good kids here too. we're drying to save them. >> the mayor told me by phone he's working on a zero tolerance program. we are live at the police department. we've just been contacted by the department. they say today's shooting victim is 27 years old. the o
, alexander calder, was also exploring those borders. his works struck a powerful chord in moore. the critic geoffrey grigson, noting the delicate balance in his work between surrealism and abstraction, called moore's work biomorphism. the term biomorphism suits moore absolutely perfectly because it signals that his preoccupation is poised somewhe between the surreal and the abstract. and it also describes beautifully the sense that we have in moore that the organism has laws of growth of its own. it's following some kind of universal law but it's not a species that we know. (narrator) throughout his long working life, moore collected natural forms and kept them near his workplace. he placed his own works side by side with objects that caught his eye: bones, shells, and flints. his own habits coincided with surrealism's interest in the found object and the creative possibilities of unexpected juxtapositions. the fusion of front and back, internal and external spaces, had been one of moore's goals since the early '30s. tunneling holes through heavy masses was a theme that preoccupied him for
specifically with seela in my office as well as gene and aleck alexander from the city attorney's office and i so i asks for your support of this ordinance. >> colleagues with ecan we take this item same time same call. >> this item is passed item 12. >>> >>> item 12 is finding the -- monitoring and reporting program relating to the fund of bridge project in aal a immediatee county. >> same house same call this resolution is adopted item 13, item 13 is establishing the appropriation limits for fiscal year 13 pursuant to. >> same call this resolution is adopted. >>> item 13 is the resident luke authorizing south of market communicate stablization and to expend fund dollars in the amounts of 770,000,. >> same house same call this resident luke is adopted. item 15 is a tax resident luxe by the finances authority for none procrastinate and not authority not no exceed 33 million and to finances owned by san francisco friends school school. same call. without objection this item is adopted. >> retroactively to accept the grands of in the apt 2,050,000 and to source 100% of san fra
dwight alexander was president of the commission. so you can call me snaggletooth today. a lot of things that were said today by the project sponsor's architect are true and factual. tom gave me a call and he got an email from director ram saying that we would like you to participate in a conference with judge bieler. the judge is a good communicator and we sat down and gave the project sponsor a simple framework. and after a couple of back and forth we watched the last commission hearing, we watched it a few times. we took notes of everything that you said. and we gave those notes and comment back to the project sponsor, because we're not experts. you are experts also and i'm curious today what your thoughts are in terms of dialogue about this project. because we have all been at this a long time. i think we have made considerable progress. there is still discussion to be made about give-back, but personally, and from what i have learned from the project sponsor, i think there is an inent and willingness to have a dialogue to see this through. you know, there are some questions about t
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